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Disney with a splash of Feminism!
I'm Lisa. I am a masters student in history who is a bit too obsessed with the Disney princesses. I am a staunch feminist and The Little Mermaid and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs are my favorite films. I am interested in labor laws/politics, women's rights, US history (thesis focuses on the American Revolution), and Disney. This is also my personal blog.

A Guide to Finding the Women and Gender Studies Graduate Program for You

thenewwomensmovement:

lipsredasroses:

thenewwomensmovement:

thenewwomensmovement:

I was recently asked how I went about choosing the Graduate Program I’m in. I figured this was a question several other people might be interested in, so I made a helpful little guide!

When choosing a graduate school, it is important to keep in mind several things:

  • location
  • cost of tuition
  • cost of moving
  • cost of living (Let’s face it: there are a lot of costs. All totally worth it if you love what you’re doing.)
  • focus of the program (Is it teaching-focused?/research-focused?/etc.)
  • key aspects of the program (Do you want a program that focuses more on gender studies? Feminism? Womanism? Spirituality? Academia? etc.)
  • research interests of the professors (as you will be doing a thesis/dissertation at some point, and it is much more exciting/helpful to have professors interested in your area of work/research.)
  • Teaching/Research Assisting Opportunities 

Essentially, just make sure you read everything you can about the programs you’re interested in. I made a list of options I was interested in, and kept adding information to it. The one left standing with the most interesting and excited notes was the program I ended up in. 

There’s not many Women’s Studies/Gender Studies/Feminist Studies programs in the United States, so there aren’t an infinite number of options. It’s also very important to keep the name of the program in mind, as that will be how it is focused. For example, “Feminist Studies” will be more oriented towards feminism rather than all of “Women’s Studies.” “Women’s Studies” is likely to more fully explore Womanism and the various contributions of all types of women throughout history. (Feminism being included, of course.) So definitely keep the name of the program in mind. 

Also, for my fellow Southerners growing up in states without Women’s Studies graduate programs, be sure to check out:  The Academic Common Market: Southern Regional Education Board. Through this, I got in-state tuition in Texas since Arkansas didn’t have a Women’s Studies program.

Helpful Links:

1. A list of Master’s and PhD Programs in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies - http://graduate-school.phds.org/find/programs/gender-studies  (Though this needs to be updated because some of the names of the programs are wrong. If you find something you’re interested in, be sure to get your information from that program’s site.)

2. Ms. Magazine has a map of the Women’s Studies PhD programs in the US - http://www.msmagazine.com/womensstudies/phd.asp - (This also needs to be updated because Texas Woman’s University does have a Women’s Studies PhD program.)

3. A list of ALL Women’s Studies programs in the US (Graduate and Undergraduate) - http://www.artemisguide.com

And if anyone has further questions, I’ll be happy to answer them.

Reblogging this helpful little guide I made because it’s that time of the year again!

Good luck on your applications, everyone! :)

I’m going to sound like a buzz kill but if you want to go into academics, considering getting a PhD in another field like sociology, history, etc. with a focus on women’s history, feminist studies, etc. You are more likely to get a job in academics with a PhD in history focusing on women’s history than you are a PhD in women’s studies. There are more history programs, sociology programs, english programs, etc. hiring people than there are women’s studies. How you market your research is important but at the end of the day, if you want to remain in academics what degree you have DOES matter. I’ve only had one women’s studies professor with a degree in women’s studies… The head of the women’s studies program at my school doesn’t even have her PhD in women’s studies.

Also, depending on what you are interested in, women’s studies might not be the best fit. If you are interested in women’s history, a women’s studies grad program probably isn’t the best fit. For example, I chose to get my masters in history so I could focus on women’s history. Women’s studies programs are too contemporary for me. My field of research is Early American women’s history. Even if I was interested in 20th century US history, most women’s studies programs I looked at only focused on 2nd and 3rd wave feminism, still too modern/contemporary for me (my undergrad research was on women’s suffrage).

Also talk to your advisor/professors who would be writing your recommendations, they probably know of programs you did not think of.

I should note I have dual degrees in Gender & Women’s Studies and history. I chose to get my masters in history and not women’s studies.

Let me emphasize that this list isn’t titled “For Those Who Want to Work in Academia.” Absolutely, there aren’t nearly enough Women’s Studies teaching positions across the nation. Why? Because there isn’t enough Women’s Studies programs, and it’s going to take feminist activists trained in Women and Gender Studies that are dedicated to opening up new programs and pushing for change in academia to make that happen. 

This is a guide for those passionate about Women and Gender/Feminist Studies, for people who want to pursue those areas of study by getting an advanced degree in that field. Not someone who’s just looking for any academic teaching position. 

Also, reinforcing the superiority of male-dominated “traditional” disciplines that prioritize Cartesian modes of knowing might be “realistic” in today’s oppressive academic climate, but it isn’t exactly feminist or womanist. 

People who are passionate about feminist/gender studies also want to go into academia. People can be passionate about women’s studies and not get their PhD in the field. People without their PhD in women’s studies HAVE opened (and continue to open) women’s studies programs. The head of my department pushed for Women’s Studies for years before she got the program up and running. She also has a degree in Sociology. I am getting my degree in history but that doesn’t mean I’m any less passionate about women’s studies. I just understand the state of academia and understand while I may be passionate about women’s studies, at the end of the day I have a better chance of not getting a job with a PhD in women’s studies than I do history. Anyone considering going into a grad program should be well aware of that fact. That is just the state of academia. 

Also, you can focus on gender, feminism, etc. in “traditional” disciplines. Academia is not going to change if everyone interested in women, gender, feminism, etc. remain in women’s studies programs. 

Also, this was the biggest reason I didn’t go into women’s studies, there was no women’s studies programs that met my needs academically. They were too modernist and mostly focused on the social sciences (not that it’s a bad thing, I had a minor in sociology). I wasn’t able to focus on history and not a single school I looked at would have allowed me to look at history. Someone who wants to focus on say media may have an easier time getting to do their research in a media studies or sociology program than they would a women’s studies program. Someone interested in history, even if its post-WWII US history, would have an easier time going into a history grad program that is known for women’s history. Women’s Studies is not the end all be all of feminist scholarship in academics. Even people passionate about women’s studies may not find a program that suits their needs but may find a history, english, media studies, sociology, etc. program that does. 


goingdownthebayou:

I am so sorry this is so long. I didn’t mean for it to be like this, tried arranging some side by side but the size difference is jarring.

Don’t reblog this, The reblog friendly link is right here.

So sorry for the major scroll!! <3


A Guide to Finding the Women and Gender Studies Graduate Program for You

thenewwomensmovement:

thenewwomensmovement:

I was recently asked how I went about choosing the Graduate Program I’m in. I figured this was a question several other people might be interested in, so I made a helpful little guide!

When choosing a graduate school, it is important to keep in mind several things:

  • location
  • cost of tuition
  • cost of moving
  • cost of living (Let’s face it: there are a lot of costs. All totally worth it if you love what you’re doing.)
  • focus of the program (Is it teaching-focused?/research-focused?/etc.)
  • key aspects of the program (Do you want a program that focuses more on gender studies? Feminism? Womanism? Spirituality? Academia? etc.)
  • research interests of the professors (as you will be doing a thesis/dissertation at some point, and it is much more exciting/helpful to have professors interested in your area of work/research.)
  • Teaching/Research Assisting Opportunities 

Essentially, just make sure you read everything you can about the programs you’re interested in. I made a list of options I was interested in, and kept adding information to it. The one left standing with the most interesting and excited notes was the program I ended up in. 

There’s not many Women’s Studies/Gender Studies/Feminist Studies programs in the United States, so there aren’t an infinite number of options. It’s also very important to keep the name of the program in mind, as that will be how it is focused. For example, “Feminist Studies” will be more oriented towards feminism rather than all of “Women’s Studies.” “Women’s Studies” is likely to more fully explore Womanism and the various contributions of all types of women throughout history. (Feminism being included, of course.) So definitely keep the name of the program in mind. 

Also, for my fellow Southerners growing up in states without Women’s Studies graduate programs, be sure to check out:  The Academic Common Market: Southern Regional Education Board. Through this, I got in-state tuition in Texas since Arkansas didn’t have a Women’s Studies program.

Helpful Links:

1. A list of Master’s and PhD Programs in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies - http://graduate-school.phds.org/find/programs/gender-studies  (Though this needs to be updated because some of the names of the programs are wrong. If you find something you’re interested in, be sure to get your information from that program’s site.)

2. Ms. Magazine has a map of the Women’s Studies PhD programs in the US - http://www.msmagazine.com/womensstudies/phd.asp - (This also needs to be updated because Texas Woman’s University does have a Women’s Studies PhD program.)

3. A list of ALL Women’s Studies programs in the US (Graduate and Undergraduate) - http://www.artemisguide.com

And if anyone has further questions, I’ll be happy to answer them.

Reblogging this helpful little guide I made because it’s that time of the year again!

Good luck on your applications, everyone! :)

I’m going to sound like a buzz kill but if you want to go into academics, considering getting a PhD in another field like sociology, history, etc. with a focus on women’s history, feminist studies, etc. You are more likely to get a job in academics with a PhD in history focusing on women’s history than you are a PhD in women’s studies. There are more history programs, sociology programs, english programs, etc. hiring people than there are women’s studies. How you market your research is important but at the end of the day, if you want to remain in academics what degree you have DOES matter. I’ve only had one women’s studies professor with a degree in women’s studies… The head of the women’s studies program at my school doesn’t even have her PhD in women’s studies.

Also, depending on what you are interested in, women’s studies might not be the best fit. If you are interested in women’s history, a women’s studies grad program probably isn’t the best fit. For example, I chose to get my masters in history so I could focus on women’s history. Women’s studies programs are too contemporary for me. My field of research is Early American women’s history. Even if I was interested in 20th century US history, most women’s studies programs I looked at only focused on 2nd and 3rd wave feminism, still too modern/contemporary for me (my undergrad research was on women’s suffrage).

Also talk to your advisor/professors who would be writing your recommendations, they probably know of programs you did not think of.

I should note I have dual degrees in Gender & Women’s Studies and history. I chose to get my masters in history and not women’s studies.


Sleeping Beauty (USA, 1959)



madamdisney:

Favorite animated ladies-- 10/100: Pocahontas{1995}
"Is all my dreaming at an end? Or do you still wait for me, dream giver, just around the riverbend?”

comfortable-disarray:

smartgirlsattheparty:

"When I started playing Detective Olivia Benson, I began to get a lot of letters from viewers. I had gotten fan mail before, but these letters were different. They were coming from individuals who were disclosing histories of violence and abuse - a lot of them for the first time. I knew I had to do something, so I trained to become a rape crisis counselor, I joined Boards, I got involved. I was proud to be on a show that was brave enough to go into territory that no one was talking about, but I also knew I wanted to do more and play a larger role to help survivors heal and reclaim their lives. In 2004 I created the Joyful Heart Foundation with the mission to heal, educate, and empower survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and child abuse, and to shed light on the darkness surrounding these issues. I’m very proud to report that since we began, we’ve provided direct services to over 5,400 people, and that we’re determined to change the conversation about violence and abuse.”

- Mariska Hargitay

Queen🙌

sdgpictures:

#soundsational #snowwhite #princess #disneyprincess #princesssnowwhite #disney #disneyland #disneyparks #disneyparade #disneycharacter #disneylandresort


indefinitedisneykid asked: pocahontas or mulan

Let it break upon you like a wave upon the sand.


huffle-fluff:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"As someone suffering from depression, I find Elsa’s ‘Let It Go’ misleading. You don’t just suddenly stop suffering from depression as the movie makes it out to be. It’s a long process, and it’s not magically vanished by a song and throwing a glove in the air"

I SCROLLED PAST THIS BUT THOUGHT ABOUT IT FOR LIKE THREE MORE MINUTES SO UGH LET ME MAKE ONE THING ABSOLUTELY CLEAR OKAY

"Let It Go" is NOT the cure for Elsa’s depression or whatever you might call is that she’s feeling. On the contrary, it is actually a really destructive song. She spends the entire scene building a world in which she’s the only one and shuts everyone out in fear of hurting them because she believes that being absolutely and completely alone is the only way for her to exist without bringing anyone harm. (Things depressed people do.) While she builds her castle, the ice and snow cover everything else in the kingdom, which means that by fleeing into this fortress of false hope and freedom, everyone else waiting for her to come back gets to suffer even more. (Things depressed people do!) Whenever I watch the scene, what I think is "No no no that’s not the way to do things" and if Anna visiting the palace later and admiring everything and wishing for her to come back and Elsa suddenly realizing she made the wrong decision by putting up those literal walls — “I’m such a fool, I can’t be free” — and Anna having to show her she needs to openly embrace and share who she is with the people she loves in order to really be free and not isolate herself and live in her fictional world where everything is okay while the outside world suffers from her actions (THINGS DEPRESSED PEOPLE FUCKING DO), then I don’t know what to tell you. You might have watched a different movie because honestly, how can you misunderstand this.


Cinderella, you’re as lovely as your name